itwonlast

All you ever wanted to know about the Cosby sweaters (and more): The available camera technology meant that certain patterns and textures had to be carefully avoided. “The show was shot with multi-cameras,” says Lemire (costume designer), “and back then they had a lot of problems with strobing, so it was very difficult to use certain patterns.” The stockinette stitch, a standard on most sweaters, alternates rows of knitted and purled stitches, which results in a subtle ribbing or stripe effect. The cameras used for “The Cosby Show” made even solid-colored stockinette sweaters vibrate or strobe when onscreen.
Thus Lemire turned to the complicated prints that made up much of the fashion lexicon during the 1980s. “The predominant company that made Bill’s sweaters was Perry Ellis, and that’s because they didn’t cost too much money, they used a flatter knit, and they would have patterns, meaning I could have color there without Bill being in a solid color.”
“I had very little money to use, and it never grew to very much, so I borrowed stuff. The garment district, and Missoni in particular, was wonderful about loaning them.” Ultimately, Cosby’s sweaters came from all kinds of sources, ranging from mainstream department store labels to handmade, one-of-a-kind items.

All you ever wanted to know about the Cosby sweaters (and more): The available camera technology meant that certain patterns and textures had to be carefully avoided. “The show was shot with multi-cameras,” says Lemire (costume designer), “and back then they had a lot of problems with strobing, so it was very difficult to use certain patterns.” The stockinette stitch, a standard on most sweaters, alternates rows of knitted and purled stitches, which results in a subtle ribbing or stripe effect. The cameras used for “The Cosby Show” made even solid-colored stockinette sweaters vibrate or strobe when onscreen.

Thus Lemire turned to the complicated prints that made up much of the fashion lexicon during the 1980s. “The predominant company that made Bill’s sweaters was Perry Ellis, and that’s because they didn’t cost too much money, they used a flatter knit, and they would have patterns, meaning I could have color there without Bill being in a solid color.”

“I had very little money to use, and it never grew to very much, so I borrowed stuff. The garment district, and Missoni in particular, was wonderful about loaning them.” Ultimately, Cosby’s sweaters came from all kinds of sources, ranging from mainstream department store labels to handmade, one-of-a-kind items.

Lars Von Trier’s Kingdom (Riget) tv show opening. For some reason that sequence was shown as trailer in theaters around 1994-95, including before kids movies. I must have seen it a couple of times and it used the scare the shit out of me. I only discovered recently what the trailer was from but that sequence is burned into my brain.


AMC ! AMC ! AMC !

AMC ! AMC ! AMC !

Crossing my fingers this is any good.
Edit, just watched it: mehhh…

Crossing my fingers this is any good.

Edit, just watched it: mehhh…

Truxton Spangler, best villain on tv right now. It’s all in the off-ness and that slightly Christopher Walken-ish speech rythm.

Truxton Spangler, best villain on tv right now. It’s all in the off-ness and that slightly Christopher Walken-ish speech rythm.