itwonlast

Bit of plagiarism at the NY Times ?

Ben Wiseman’s illustration for the Times November 3, 2013 Book Review vs. Geoff McFetridge's 2012 paintings 3X3 and 3X3(Dealing With Abstraction) (among others)

Frontside 3 (Blue)Geoff McFetridge Silkscreen on Paper, Edition of 6, 2011

Frontside 3 (Blue)
Geoff McFetridge
Silkscreen on Paper, Edition of 6, 2011

Spring 2013 issue of Francis Ford Coppola’s literary quarterly Zoetrope: All-Story guest designed by Geoff McFetridge

We recently asked Brecht Vandenbroucke to talk a bit about his work, here’s what he had to say: “I am a ginger artist currently living in Ghent (Belgium). I am 24. I make comics, paintings, drawings, zines, movies etc… I love art. I am interested in popular culture, happiness, insanity, surrealism, loneliness, death and alienation. Drawing is very lonely. But I also like fun, fun is good. I’ve been making stuff all of my life and I guess I will continue doing it until the day I die. life is too short, there is not enough time to do everything I want to and I find that sometimes a bit depressing.”
When asked what inspires and informs his work, Brecht says “Ideas pop in to my head all the time, So I write them down. I write a lot. The moment I have an idea I see the entire image in my head. But then I look for more information on the subject to avoid cliches. the right colour/car/computer/furniture/plants,/guitar, etc… Everything has to be right.  I like pulling stuff from reality into my work. I used to work with a sketchbook and make detailed compositions and sketches of everything but I found it much easier lately to paint the images immediately, and just see what comes out. It’s easy as I can erase mistakes whenever I want.
Talking about his influences, Brecht elaborates: “I like lots of artists and illustrators but I think I’ve been mostly influenced by the work of Mark Beyer, ATAK, Charlotte Solomon, Topor, Henry Darger, David Shrigley, Daisuke Ichiba and Glen Baxter. They rock. But I also love Disney and crappy comics. I love culture in all forms, I don’t see a difference between pop culture and underground culture.” (via)

We recently asked Brecht Vandenbroucke to talk a bit about his work, here’s what he had to say: “I am a ginger artist currently living in Ghent (Belgium). I am 24. I make comics, paintings, drawings, zines, movies etc… I love art. I am interested in popular culture, happiness, insanity, surrealism, loneliness, death and alienation. Drawing is very lonely. But I also like fun, fun is good. I’ve been making stuff all of my life and I guess I will continue doing it until the day I die. life is too short, there is not enough time to do everything I want to and I find that sometimes a bit depressing.”

When asked what inspires and informs his work, Brecht says “Ideas pop in to my head all the time, So I write them down. I write a lot. The moment I have an idea I see the entire image in my head. But then I look for more information on the subject to avoid cliches. the right colour/car/computer/furniture/plants,/guitar, etc… Everything has to be right.  I like pulling stuff from reality into my work. I used to work with a sketchbook and make detailed compositions and sketches of everything but I found it much easier lately to paint the images immediately, and just see what comes out. It’s easy as I can erase mistakes whenever I want.

Talking about his influences, Brecht elaborates: “I like lots of artists and illustrators but I think I’ve been mostly influenced by the work of Mark Beyer, ATAK, Charlotte Solomon, Topor, Henry Darger, David Shrigley, Daisuke Ichiba and Glen Baxter. They rock. But I also love Disney and crappy comics. I love culture in all forms, I don’t see a difference between pop culture and underground culture.” (via)

gurafiku: Japanese Magazine Cover: Brutus 726. Taiyo Matsumoto. 2012

gurafiku: Japanese Magazine Cover: Brutus 726. Taiyo Matsumoto. 2012

Adrian Tomine: My First New Yorker cover 
I think this is one of those ideas that’s more likely to occur to someone who had just recently moved to New York. If you’ve lived here your whole life, you probably just think of the subway as a way of getting from point A to point B. But to me it was fascinating the way subway cars sometimes run alongside each other, just inches apart, and occasionally line up at the same speed.  Sometimes you make eye contact with someone in the other train, which is usually more awkward than anything else, but I turned it into something kind of romantic or wistful.

Adrian Tomine: My First New Yorker cover

I think this is one of those ideas that’s more likely to occur to someone who had just recently moved to New York. If you’ve lived here your whole life, you probably just think of the subway as a way of getting from point A to point B. But to me it was fascinating the way subway cars sometimes run alongside each other, just inches apart, and occasionally line up at the same speed.  Sometimes you make eye contact with someone in the other train, which is usually more awkward than anything else, but I turned it into something kind of romantic or wistful.

David Hockney’s 1972 Munich Olympics poster

David Hockney’s 1972 Munich Olympics poster

Studio Ghibli by Olly Moss

Studio Ghibli by Olly Moss