itwonlast

Andrei Tarkovsky and crew on the set of The Sacrifice, 1985

Andrei Tarkovsky and crew on the set of The Sacrifice, 1985

Hiroshima Mon Amour (Alain Resnais, 1959)

Opening sequence

La Dernière Clé de Marienbad, published in the special issue of Cahiers du Cinema devoted to Last Year at Marienbad, shows us the sheet created by script girl Sylvette Baudrot to keep track of all the different timelines in the film. Resnais asked to have it printed upside down. (via)

La Dernière Clé de Marienbad, published in the special issue of Cahiers du Cinema devoted to Last Year at Marienbad, shows us the sheet created by script girl Sylvette Baudrot to keep track of all the different timelines in the film. Resnais asked to have it printed upside down. (via)

The Past (Asghar Farhadi, 2013)

Boyhood (formerly Growing Up) is an upcoming film directed by Richard Linklater chronicling over the course of twelve years the lives of a young boy (from first grade at age 6 through 12th grade), his older sister and their divorced parents. Linklater began shooting in 2002 and has been filming more of the story intermittently since, all the way through 2013: “Every summer, I get together with the actors and we film a little bit. It’s about a kid growing up — that’s the gist of it. It’s a crazy idea, but it’s been an interesting process, I’m always looking for a different way to tell a story, and that seemed like a great way to show someone growing up.”
Ethan Hawke who plays the father shared some thoughts on the project in his June 2013 Reddit AMA;


Richard Linklater and I have made a short film every year for the last 11 years, one more to go, that follows the development of a young boy from age 6 to 18. I play the father, and it’s Tolstoy-esque in scope. I thought the BEFORE series was the most unique thing I would ever be a part of, but Rick has engaged me in something even more strange. Doing a scene with a young boy at the age of 7 when he talks about why do raccoons die, and at the age of 12 when he talks about video games, and 17 when he asks me about girls, and have it be the same actor - to watch his voice and body morph - it’s a little bit like timelapse photography of a human being. I can’t wait for people to see it.
Next year, he will graduate high school and we will finish the film. It will probably come out in 2 years.


Shot over the course of 39 days spread across more than a decade, the film allows Linklater to explore further his predilection for fluid, organically developed character-driven stories and to expand on the theme of ‘time passing’ so central to his work and already masterfully portrayed in the Before…trilogy
While Michael Apted’s Up documentary series (following  the lives of 14 children since 1963 and checking in on their lives every seven years from 7 Up to last year’s 56 Up) and Steve James’ Hoop Dreams both adopted a similar approach, its use for a fiction film is unprecedented.

Boyhood (formerly Growing Up) is an upcoming film directed by Richard Linklater chronicling over the course of twelve years the lives of a young boy (from first grade at age 6 through 12th grade), his older sister and their divorced parents. Linklater began shooting in 2002 and has been filming more of the story intermittently since, all the way through 2013: “Every summer, I get together with the actors and we film a little bit. It’s about a kid growing up — that’s the gist of it. It’s a crazy idea, but it’s been an interesting process, I’m always looking for a different way to tell a story, and that seemed like a great way to show someone growing up.”

Ethan Hawke who plays the father shared some thoughts on the project in his June 2013 Reddit AMA;

Richard Linklater and I have made a short film every year for the last 11 years, one more to go, that follows the development of a young boy from age 6 to 18. I play the father, and it’s Tolstoy-esque in scope. I thought the BEFORE series was the most unique thing I would ever be a part of, but Rick has engaged me in something even more strange. Doing a scene with a young boy at the age of 7 when he talks about why do raccoons die, and at the age of 12 when he talks about video games, and 17 when he asks me about girls, and have it be the same actor - to watch his voice and body morph - it’s a little bit like timelapse photography of a human being. I can’t wait for people to see it.

Next year, he will graduate high school and we will finish the film. It will probably come out in 2 years.

Shot over the course of 39 days spread across more than a decade, the film allows Linklater to explore further his predilection for fluid, organically developed character-driven stories and to expand on the theme of ‘time passing’ so central to his work and already masterfully portrayed in the Before…trilogy

While Michael Apted’s Up documentary series (following  the lives of 14 children since 1963 and checking in on their lives every seven years from 7 Up to last year’s 56 Up) and Steve James’ Hoop Dreams both adopted a similar approach, its use for a fiction film is unprecedented.

William Gibson’s Alien 3:
Whilst brainstorming, Giler and Hill also met with science-fiction author William Gibson, whose 1984 novel The Neuromancer helped usher in cyberpunk. Gibson accepted Brandywine’s offer: they would come up with a story, and he would write the script.
But Gibson was swayed by more than the promise of a paycheck. “I found a lot of things that were interesting in the original [Alien] even when it first came out,” he explained. “I thought there were germs of stories implicit in the art direction. I always wanted to know more about these guys. Like why they were wearing dirty sneakers in this funked-up spaceship. I think it influenced my prose science-fiction writing because it was the first funked-up, dirty kitchen-sink spaceship, and it made a big impression on me.”
The Blade Runner-esque idea interested Gibson, but he was quickly set right by the producers. “The impression I had,” Gibson said, “was that budget parameters argued against introducing the Aliens into something that was the equivalent of the Blade Runner set, which I admit would have been my natural impulse.”
“Alien 3 generated a stack of scripts a foot high, before there could be a movie,” Gibson said through his Twitter feed in March 2013. “That Alien 3 script was my first screenplay. Worked w/ scripts of first two as my sole model of the form.”
“Only one detail survived [from my script],” said Gibson. “In my draft, this woman has a bar code on the back of her hand. In the shooting script [and final movie], one of the guys has a shaved head and a bar code on the back of his head. I’ll always privately think that was my piece of Alien 3.”

William Gibson’s Alien 3:

Whilst brainstorming, Giler and Hill also met with science-fiction author William Gibson, whose 1984 novel The Neuromancer helped usher in cyberpunk. Gibson accepted Brandywine’s offer: they would come up with a story, and he would write the script.

But Gibson was swayed by more than the promise of a paycheck. “I found a lot of things that were interesting in the original [Alien] even when it first came out,” he explained. “I thought there were germs of stories implicit in the art direction. I always wanted to know more about these guys. Like why they were wearing dirty sneakers in this funked-up spaceship. I think it influenced my prose science-fiction writing because it was the first funked-up, dirty kitchen-sink spaceship, and it made a big impression on me.”

The Blade Runner-esque idea interested Gibson, but he was quickly set right by the producers. “The impression I had,” Gibson said, “was that budget parameters argued against introducing the Aliens into something that was the equivalent of the Blade Runner set, which I admit would have been my natural impulse.”

Alien 3 generated a stack of scripts a foot high, before there could be a movie,” Gibson said through his Twitter feed in March 2013. “That Alien 3 script was my first screenplay. Worked w/ scripts of first two as my sole model of the form.”

“Only one detail survived [from my script],” said Gibson. “In my draft, this woman has a bar code on the back of her hand. In the shooting script [and final movie], one of the guys has a shaved head and a bar code on the back of his head. I’ll always privately think that was my piece of Alien 3.”

All Is Lost (J. C. Chandor, 2013)

Andrei Tarkovsky: A Photographic Chronicle of The Making of The Sacrifice takes an intimate look at the making of Tarkovsky’s final masterpiece shot during the summer of 1985 on the Swedish island of Gotland. Author Layla Alexander-Garrett who worked as Tarkovsky’s interpreter took over two hundred photographs whilst on set recording the process of making the film as well as Tarkovsky’s life in Sweden. Each of the photos are accompanied by scene-setting English text (side by side with Russian text) and are often fascinating - Tarkovsky having an entire field plucked of yellow flowers before shooting, actor Erland Josephson snoozing between takes or Tarkovsky and cameraman Sven Nykvist waiting to play a game of tennis.