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Melvin Sokolsky’s Bubbles
"Astonishingly inventive" and "technically consummate" are typical of the encomiums that Sokolsky’s photographs elicit. The constant stream of frequently audacious ideas that he brought, month after month, to the pages of Harper’s Bazaar certainly bears witness to the claims of fecundity. And the effects he achieved, apparently effortlessly, were the result of tireless experimentation and skillful craftsmanship. He stretched beyond the nominal brief of illustrating clothes, urged on by his tenacious imagination, fired up by an almost child-like thrill with the power of the image, with articulating the body-in-space, and the search to find new ways to make an impact on the magazine page.Perhaps the most celebrated of all was the acclaimed “Bubble” series for the Spring 1963 Paris Collections. These remarkable photographs constitute a kind of finale to the fantasy era of Paris fashion, a warm-humored tribute to inexplicable excess. Salvador Dalí, whom he met at this time, became convinced that Sokolsky could actually make him fly. The logical outcome of the epic “Bubble” pictures for Sokolsky was to investigate further the simulation of flight, of weightlessness, which he did in some compelling sequences that continue to influence fashion photographers today. The series, inspired by The  Garden of Earthly Delights and Surrealism, depicts  model Simone D’Aillencourt in large bubbles floating  through the Paris cityscape. The  plexiglass bubbles were hung from a crane in various locations  throughout Paris.

Melvin Sokolsky’s Bubbles

"Astonishingly inventive" and "technically consummate" are typical of the encomiums that Sokolsky’s photographs elicit. The constant stream of frequently audacious ideas that he brought, month after month, to the pages of Harper’s Bazaar certainly bears witness to the claims of fecundity. And the effects he achieved, apparently effortlessly, were the result of tireless experimentation and skillful craftsmanship. He stretched beyond the nominal brief of illustrating clothes, urged on by his tenacious imagination, fired up by an almost child-like thrill with the power of the image, with articulating the body-in-space, and the search to find new ways to make an impact on the magazine page.
Perhaps the most celebrated of all was the acclaimed “Bubble” series for the Spring 1963 Paris Collections. These remarkable photographs constitute a kind of finale to the fantasy era of Paris fashion, a warm-humored tribute to inexplicable excess. Salvador Dalí, whom he met at this time, became convinced that Sokolsky could actually make him fly. The logical outcome of the epic “Bubble” pictures for Sokolsky was to investigate further the simulation of flight, of weightlessness, which he did in some compelling sequences that continue to influence fashion photographers today. The series, inspired by The Garden of Earthly Delights and Surrealism, depicts model Simone D’Aillencourt in large bubbles floating through the Paris cityscape. The plexiglass bubbles were hung from a crane in various locations throughout Paris.

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